Lead On Lead- (Part 1 and 2) A Review of Natural Pigment’s New “Course Particle” Stack Lead White, And The Artefex 532 Extra Fine Lead Oil Primed ACM Panel

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Written by Artefex Ambassador Teresa Oaxaca
To read her entire post that includes an in depth review of Natural Pigments Stack Lead White check out her full blog on her website.
Chicken Little, oil on fine weave oil primed Artefex ACM panel, 16×20″
When trying to describe what it’s like working with lead paint, “drag” is one of the elements I like to employ in my descriptions.  In these closeups I hope you can see what I am talking about.  You’ll notice that the paint has a memory of the direction in which it was laid on, even the speed of the stroke.  The surface that you are working on plays a great deal as to what will be recorded finally in your still image.  Factors such a the amount of “bounce” that your support gives (stretched canvas as opposed to a rigid panel) and texture (such as canvas weave or smooth primed wood or metal).  In this case we will be examining ACM, or Aluminum Composite Material panels, such as the ones produced by Artefex art.  I prefer to work on linen surfaces so the degree of texture in the linen weave will play another important role, as will the composition of the priming on the surface of the weave (in this case lead white vs. a general oil primed white).
A closeup of paint strokes 
I am not yet prepared to say that I can really tell the difference between a fine grain and a course grain lead white paint.  I tend to forget such distinctions once I am involved in the actual painting process.  I do know that you can feel an almost hear a satisfying crunching noise as you blend course pigment particles into your support, particularly if you are using a hog bristle brush.
As with all painting media I would advise users to experiment with it all and decide for themselves which surfaces, textures and mediums are the most appropriate, pleasing and suitable.  You can only discover this by working and a lot of trial an error.  What is important is that you become familiar with the choices that are out there and learn to tell the differences.
Pathos, oil on fine weave oil primed Artefex ACM panel, 16×20″ with artist made frame
Until recently most of my rigid support, ACM panel investigations have been confined to small paintings.  Because of this I don’t feel the need to make too many layer passes, so the artworks you are seeing in this article were all painted in 2-3 sessions (albeit Long sessions).  I’m working on some larger panels now that are 60×40″ and 30×40″ respectively.
Flower Maiden, oil on medium weave oil primed Artefex ACM panel, 16×20″
In this detail of Flower Maiden you can see how she was painted on a slightly courser and more noticeable weave of linen.  I do like the look of a weave showing through a painting, a slightly irregular one.  I find machine-like repetitive weaves to be ugly, and am a bit at sea when painting on mylar or something plastic.
A before and after shot of Chicken Little for those of you who are curious or like to learn from process.  That’s a pretty rapid and loose under painting there of probably under an hour.  Below you see the finished product man hours later.  I don’t count, I listen to stories instead.
Madonna, oil on stretched linen canvas, 16×12″
Here are two paintings not made on an ACM panel, but on stretched canvas.  In life you can really tell the difference, but I’m not certain that it is noticeable in photographs.  As a rule of thumb I would advise working on a rigid support if you prefer a smoother surface and blending.
The Floating World, oil on stretched  linen canvas,18×24″
Here I am painting on the new Artefex 532 Extra Fine Lead Oil Primed ACM Panel. I just received this about a week ago, it’s a brand new offering from Artefex that I am having a go at. I’ve always preferred lead primed canvases due to the “lead on lead” contact that I like. The paint always seems to glide on best with oil primed canvases, but especially so on a lead primed version. Here in this video I have made a first pass at the face and am working away at the background. One of the nice things about panels is that you don’t have to worry about stretching or adding keys later in case the atmosphere makes your stretcher bars contract or expand.they are ready to go and frame pretty easily.

A Game Changer

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Copper Panel Painting by Ann Moeller Steverson

Painting on Copper by Ann Moeller Steverson

Painting on copper is a different experience. Anyone who has seen a work on copper in person knows there is a different quality and vibrancy to the intensity of the pigment. But compared to painting on canvas, painting on copper is a new and wild adventure and has an entirely different feel.
The usual smooth surface of copper is very slick so unless you have the mad wizard mastery of an artist like Steven Assael, the natural surface is best addressed with patience and a plan. Otherwise, you are just sliding around in your socks and underwear risky business style. I suggest starting by working in a block in of a thin translucent glowing first layer and then planning to build up by paint by adhering to thinner layers of pigment below. Think of sticking a stack of sticky notes together.Copper Panel Painting by Ann Moeller Steverson

I love the freedom of painting on the textured copper panels offered by Artefex. With these finely abraded panels, I can go as thin or as thick on the first layer as I want and it holds the brush stroke perfectly. There are no big canvas bumps to flight, so my paint goes much farther. The resulting brush strokes become more a reflection of the character of the brush used and the wielder rather than the texture of the surface. The amount of detail possible is incredible when there is little to no surface interference. The first layer can feel slightly thirsty, so if you want extra movement, just oil in the copper first or add a quick thin wash of solvent. The goal is to have the paint grip without interference.

The traditional method of working dark to light with very thin darks works exceptionally well when painting on copper panels. I have found that translucent shadows can be created with a beautiful transparent oxide color (brown, red, or yellow) or any mixed dark oil paint, and is a lovely way to start that keeps a warm glow. If I want to soften the marks to keep the shadow areas simple, I lightly brush over the shadow shapes with a gentle mongoose or badger hair paint brush. Lead white makes a particularly appealing stand on the copper panel where I want to develop all the subtle value shifts, fine details and lively brushstrokes in the lights of the painting. I usually shift the lights cooler to play against the warm shadows. I like to leave peak of exposed copper color in the mid tones and transitions, which adds harmony to the piece. The overall effect of warm shadows, with the exposed copper transitions, serve to unify the painting beautifully and contrast vibrantly to the cool lights. In short, the result is “zazzle.”

The effect of the painting support on the overall look of my work is transformative. After all, when it comes to painting supports, it’s literally what’s underneath that counts.

NAMTA Show Specials

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We will offer show special at Art Materials World 2015 for new and existing customers. We offer free shipping on orders of Artefex Panels, Ceracolors, Kolibri Brushes, Rublev Colours Artists Oils and Watercolors. With minimum orders of Ceracolors, Rublev Colours Artists Oils and Watercolors an additional 10% will be taken off the total order.

Basic Show Special

When ordering a minimum stocking order of Ceracolors, Rublev Colours Artists Oils or Watercolors an additional 10% off will be given on the total order.

Preferred Show Special

When ordering a minimum stocking order of all five product lines–Artefex Panels, Ceracolors, Kolibri Brushes, Rublev Colours Artists Oils and Watercolors–free shipping applies to all items and an additional 10% off will be given on the total order.

Special Deals at Art Materials World 2016

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Special Offer

We will offer show specials at Art Materials World 2016 for new and existing customers. We offer free shipping on minimum stocking orders of Artefex Panels, Ceracolors, Kolibri Brushes, Rublev Colours Artists Oil and Watercolor paints. With minimum stocking orders of three or more lines more discounts will be applied.

Special Offers for New Retailers

Basic

When you order the minimum stocking order of any line, get 5% off the net order when purchased at the show. This offer excludes Kolibri Brushes. Minimums for each product line must be met.

Preferred

When you order the minimum stocking order of three product lines, get 5% off the net order and free shipping when purchased at the show. This offer excludes Kolibri Brushes. Minimums for each product line must be met.

Premium

When ordering the minimum stocking order of five product lines, get 10% off the net order and free shipping when purchased at the show. This offer excludes Kolibri Brushes. Minimums for each product line must be met.

Special Offers for Existing Retailers

Net Orders $1,000 or More

Take 5% off of the net order placed at the show or with Artefex from February 29 to March 9, 2016 with a net total of $1,000 or more. This additional discount applies only to product lines that are currently stocked in the store.

Net Orders $3,000 or More

Take 5% off of the net order and free shipping when placed at the show or with Artefex from February 29 to March 9, 2016 with a net total of $3,000 or more. This additional discount applies only to product lines that are currently stocked in the store.

Conservar Varnish

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Conservar Varnishes

Conservar varnishes are a series of isolating and final picture varnishes and varnish kits based on materials and formulations used in current conservation practice. All these varnishes contain UV stabilizers

All Conservar varnishes contain hindered amine light stabilizers (HALS) or UV stabilizers. These act by interfering with oxidation reactions in the varnish that cause embrittlement and aging of the varnish. By incorporating HALS in Conservar varnishes a much more stable varnish is obtained. Accelerated aging experiments indicate that the lifetime is extended greatly. Monitoring of natural aging so far indicates that the stabilizer works as predicted by accelerated aging.

The HALS used in Conservar prolongs the lifetime of the varnishes dramatically. HALS are stable by themselves for a number of years, but once mixed with varnish in solution they are best used within a short period. For this reason we offer Conservar as kits so that all ingredients can be mixed fresh for use immediately. For artists reticent about preparing their own varnishes, we have also made these varnishes available as ready-made solutions in metal cans for maximum longevity and with the date of production printed on the label. The date lets artists know that they should use the varnish as soon as possible for best results.

Conserver Picture Varnish

Conserver Picture Varnish is a colorless, reversible varnish made from hydrogenated hydrocarbon (Regalrez) resin dissolved in pure, low-aromatic solvent and UV absorber and stabilizer. Conservar will not cross-link or yellow over long periods of time—much longer than natural resin varnishes. Conservar achieves optimum wetting of the paint surface to enhance colors, has minimum solvent action on paint, and maximum resin content for best coverage. It dries to a film that levels well and can be rubbed when dry just like traditional mastic or dammar varnishes.

References

E. Rene de la Rie and Christopher McGilinchey, “New Synthetic Resins for Picture Varnishes”, IIC Preprints to the Brussels Congress, pp. 168-173.1
Robert L. Feller, “Standards in the Evaluation of Thermoplastic Resins”, Preprints of ICOM in Zabreg (1978), pp. 78/16/4.

Flax Art in Fort Mason

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We are excited to introduce a new store to the Artefex family. The new Flax store is finally ready to open its doors. A great location right next to the new home of the San Francisco school of art, makes this an easy to get to store for the local artist. Flax currently carries the Rublev Oils colours, but is planing to carry other Artefex products soon. Check them out at Building D, 2 Marina Blvd, San Francisco, CA.

Flax Art

Picture Cleaning Kit

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Mini Picture Cleaning Kit

The Mini Picture Cleaning Kit contains supplies for removing surface dirt and the oxidation products from both unvarnished and varnished oil paintings. It contains both dry cleaning and aqueous cleaning materials.

Included in the Mini Picture Cleaning Kit:
Cotton-tip Applicators
Cotton Balls
Dry Cleaning Sponge (small)
Micro-Mesh Sheet
Picture CleanGel (4 fl oz)
Purified Deionized Water (4 fl oz)
Odorless Mineral Spirits (4 fl oz)

Dusting and Dry Cleaning Paintings

There are several methods to clean paint surfaces including the use of a soft hair brush to brush away dust into a vacuum.

If these methods do not clean a paint surface well enough, the next step is to use dry cleaning methods that clean the surface more aggressively. Using materials such as a microfiber cloths and dry cleaning sponges, you can safely remove dirt from the surface of the painting. If dusting and dry cleaning methods do not succeed in removing soil from paint surfaces, only then use an aqueous cleaning method.

Mini Picture Cleaning Kit
The Mini Picture Cleaning Kit contains supplies for removing surface dirt and the oxidation products from both unvarnished and varnished oil paintings. It contains both dry cleaning and aqueous cleaning materials.

Aqueous Cleaning Methods

Picture CleanGel is a solvent-free aqueous gel cleanser that is gentle to both varnished or unvarnished paint surfaces. The gel cleanser is designed to remove soil, proteinaceous and carbohydrate materials from varnished and unvarnished oil paint surfaces. It is also useful as a cleaner for paintings that have collected dirt and dust immediately prior to varnishing.

Read Tutorial for Picture Cleaning

RileyStreet Art Supply Store

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Riley StreetIf you are looking for quality art materials in the north San Francisco Bay area, RileyStreet Art Supply in San Rafael and Santa Rosa should be your first stop. The knowledgeable staff is perhaps the most impressive asset these stores posses. The stores close proximity to the Natural Pigments factory (where Rublev Colours Artist Oils and Watercolors, Ceracolors and Artefex Panels are made) gives these stores the unique ability to visit our facilities and learn first hand, how we make our products. In addition, some of the key staff have also attended the Painting Best Practices workshop. A workshop George O’Hanlon and Tatiana Zaytseva teach to educate artists about the differences in art materials throughout history and the importance of using quality art materials. This is why we are proud to announce that Riley Street Art Supply is now representing Artefex Panels, Rublev Colours Artist Oils and oil painting mediums.

We will be at the RileyStreet Santa Rosa store for their annual Anniversary Sale on Saturday, June 27th, 2015. We will be there to answer questions and provide a lecture and demonstration on Rublev Colours Artist Oil and Artefex Panels.

RileyStreet Art Supply is located at 103 Maxwell Court in Santa Rosa, CA 95401
Phone: 707-526-2416
Website: www.rileystreet.com

Rublev Colours Watercolor Pans Display

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Rublev Colours Watercolor Pan Display Case
Rublev Colours Watercolor Pan Small Display Case

Rublev Colours Watercolor Pans displays are small, lightweight cases that fit almost anywhere in your store. The display cases can remain closed to avoid inventory shrinkage, which often occurs with small items, and at the same time display  colors available to your customers. Pairing this display case with Rublev Colours Watercolor Travel Cases helps to drive sales as it gives customers the ability to choose their own colors from the range of watercolors available from Rublev Colours.
Continue reading Rublev Colours Watercolor Pans Display